Sunday – Paint, Words and Dad

I got up and out this morning. Forgot about people heading out to brunch for Dad. Bad news: had to wait quite awhile for food (ordered to go because the place was 100% packed). Good news: by the time my food came, on a plate, there were open tables. So it all worked out ok.

Thought I’d do a quick check on the blue herons and stayed to do a painting. Before I’d started on the scene, a father and child showed up, and stayed just long enough for a couple fishing casts and then they were gone again. Made me think about all the happy (and long boring) time spent in our boats fishing over the years. Millions of shiners caught individually by Dad, early in the morning. His time on the lake which let him spend more pleasant time on the lake, catching bigger fish.

This was my bigger painting:

and calling it complete. I was pretty happy with it and hope to do more “less detailed” or looser paintings this week.

I had a couple other visitors too

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Still painting and stuff

This morning I stopped at a local park and painted the lake in between rain sprinkles. There was some sort of fishing event going on, the place was packed but as far as I could see I was the only painter.

From this morning:

From the other night at the local pond:

My aim is not to exhibit craft, but rather to submerge it, and make it rightfully the handmaiden of beauty, power and emotional content. — Andrew Wyeth

Sunday at The Clark

I went over to see the new exhibit at the Clark: Women Artists in Paris, 1850-1900 and had a good time looking at the paintings. First off, they are, as a whole, much larger than you might expect. I will have to do more reading about this – maybe it’s what people who’ve been to real painting school do.

I took down this quote, her reflection on being an artist after returning to her homeland of Finland (where she did not exhibit for a decade):

How right you were when you wrote about museum men, critics. They kill everything that is your own, beautiful and alive, and take what is already a success. The little and poor just paint and struggle, they can die unless they love their work, then they live, rather briefly, yet forever.
— Helene Schjerfbeck, 1919

After enjoying the exhibit, I took some paint supplies up the hill and painted awhile.. There were a lot of people around and they came and went frequently. Many people commented on the little bit of trash that someone had left in the sculpture/building we were in, the Crystal, but no one picked it up to carry down the hill; I did though when I left. If there had been a broom handy, it needed a good sweeping out of all the rocks that kids bring with them.

Then it was off to have dinner with Mom and that was the end of my travels for the day.

Geraniums

I’m not a bedding sort of gardener. I used to be a serious gardener, knowing all the real names of things and their growing requirements and all but now… well, I enjoy what I have and take things as they come. Even though I don’t do window boxes or planters I do like a good geranium. Last year I had one that was quite small and bushy and so dark red it was almost black. And it seems to have survived being dormant for the winter. We’ll see what happens to it. This year I got two more traditional pots, meant to hang, of “ivy” type geraniums. One is a darker burgundy color and the other is the standard bright scarlet. And I won’t lie, I got them mainly as things to enjoy and to paint. So here are the first goes at painting geraniums.

and now, the patient and beautiful real geranium.

The Journey, The Journal

https://www.nytimes.com/video/players/offsite/index.html?videoId=100000005773630

What a cool little op-doc piece and what a wonderful gift to give yourself and your family.

So Much Depends…

On a red shopping cart.

By Popular Demand: Kitties!