Yes, It’s That Day Again

There’s nothing like folding a whole lot of fat quarters to start a new day and year off right. To my eyes this is not color accurate but to give you an idea of my ironing board when I got done (does not include all the fabrics that followed me home from my vacation with mom)

Following the breadcrumbs

I had to go look up Ad Reinhardt and what he was all about. Found this recounting of “The Twelve Technical Rules (or How to Achieve the Twelve Things to Avoid)…”

12. No object, no subject, no matter. No symbols, images or signs. Neither pleasure nor pain. No mindless working or mindless non-working. No chessplaying.

Supplementary regulations are: No easel or palette. Low, flat, sturdy benches work well. Brushes should be new, clean, flat, even, 1 inch wide and strong. “If the heart is upright, the brush is firm.” No noise. “The brush should pass over the surface lightly and smoothly” and quietly. No rubbing or scraping. Paint should be permanent, free of impurities, mixed and stored in jars. The scent should be of “pure spirits of turpentine, unadulterated and freshly distilled.” “The glue should be as clean as possible.” Canvas is better than silk or paper, linen better than cotton. There should be no shine in the finish. Gloss reflects and relates to the changing surroundings. “A picture is finished when all traces of the means used to bring about the end have disappeared.”

The fine art studio should have a “rain-tight roof” and be 25 feet wide and 30 feet long, with extra space for storage and sink. Paintings should be stored away and not continually looked at. The ceiling should be 12 feet high. The studio should be separate from the home and living, “away from the claims of concubinage and matrimony.” A fine art department should be separate from the rest of the school.

Doesn’t that space seem appealing, filled with your materials and ideas? While I can’t hold to all the other “rules” since there are many great pieces of work that are well outside them, I can respect them and that last part.

Robert Genn would tell you

The easel is an altar to productivity. Traditional altars have been places of worship and sacrifice, and the studio easel is no exception. He who would do well at one must respect and honour the gods of quality, truth, composition, imagination, pattern, perspective, story, drawing, colour, fantasy and flair. To stand or sit at one, even in play, you need to prepare yourself for labour.

The easel is also a place of sacrifice. Substandard passages or whole works are summarily struck down at this often troubling altar–but rebirth is its usual fruit. Both honour and responsibility go with your easel, your altar.

TGIF and TG for Postcards

What a long, harried, worrisome, angrifying week or so it’s been. Not to say it’s all been that way but it sure has had moments and stretches.

Today I took a pokemon pause of the way home just a half hour space of listening to the inspirational and funny and wonderful Neil Gaiman reading his View From The Cheap Seats and throwing little virtual balls at little, often annoying, virtual critters. I’d stopped on the way because after replacing my printer, I ran out of postcard-sized paper! What???? Fixed that.

Got postcard supplies for future cards. Caught pokemon. Came home and there, in the mailbox, two postcards! Two wonderful and most extremely appreciated cards and poems. Thank you two fabulous group one poets! (and there was a box of something to be revealed in December!)

Day off, filled with geeky-poetry-ness

As the 2016 Postcard Poetry Fest starts to wind up, I decided I needed to reorganize the links to the other years. Maybe it would be better to do them as a gallery. That will only take a few minutes, right? Yeah right.

Anyway, Up at the top of the quiltr.com page, you’ll see the PoPoFest link. Now you can view 2014 and 2015 as a gallery. No names or addresses… Obviously 2016 isn’t complete yet.

 

Things I do…

while listening to other things:

Sunday, August Is Flying

When I got home tonight, there was still the August Postcard Poetry Fest poem to get done. Earlier today I’d responded to a post on Facebook and thought and then forgot about the line which I thought, at the time, would make a great inclusion in a poem. I was a good way down the poem when I remembered! Yeah coffee! So the poem includes the line

the red caboose of contentment.

Because who could resist that line?

At the meeting, someone pointed out an actual slide from an actual Macworld keynote… I knew where my July 2001 badge was. It hangs over my desk. At some point, I had put my old-new name on it again, but everything else is as it was, before the world changed.

Three Hundred Thirty-three of you or so…

have looked at my site and the post re Kathy Nida’s quilts being pulled by AQS.

PLEASE if you haven’t actually written to AQS please do so:

bonnie.browning@americanquilter.com
terry.guill@americanquilter.com

and you could write or CC Studio Art Quilters Association, SAQA at:

ExecDirector@saqa.com

Discussing on FB and social media is great so please link to Kathy’s site and keep talking about it whereever you’ll rally support, but PLEASE WRITE/EMAIL. The people involved with those decisions need to hear from each of you. Not writing is silent consent.

Thank you.

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